Cinematic Wanderings: the Sinful Dwarf, Naughty Nuns, and Varied Pulp Smut

I realize that the TRVER members of the cult film community will get the vapors upon reading this, but I’ve become a convert to the world of streaming cinema. HEAR ME OUT, friends–I retain enough firing neurons from back in the day to tell you that your local mom & pop video store wasn’t exactly the Library of Alexandria, so you can leave your belly aching about “selection” at the door. Unless the specific thrill of the DVD hunt moistens your undercarriage, I defy you to have a better movie-watching experience than the one provided by the archives at Fandor (a site that I pay for and that in no way compensates me for saying nice things). Below are just a handful of titles I’ve watched over the past few months on this thoroughly wonderful site.

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The Sinful Dwarf: OK, so a lot of you have told me to watch this, and I ignored you. Joke’s on me, because this was exploitation bliss. For the uninitiated, this is the tale of Olaf, a little person who traps unsuspecting young women into lives of drugged-up sex slavery in a bordello run by his mother, a fading former cabaret star. It doesn’t sound appetizing, and it is indeed a thoroughly unsavory viewing experience. The Sinful Dwarf is elevated past similar fare by its details: close-ups on wind-up toys, lengthy song and dance performances, and an underlying moral about the dangers of a career as a screenwriter combine to make this an unforgettable trash cinema classic. Thanks, Denmark!

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Cloistered Nun: Runa’s Confession: The Japanese have weird ideas about both consent and Christianity, so proceed with caution. Should you be able to deal with that, then boyfriend-stealing, double-crossing, sexed-up melodrama awaits you!

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The Secret of Dorian Gray: Look, I already wrote about this one five years ago. It’s got Helmut Berger in all states of sexy dress and undress, plus it’s a Harry Alan Towers “literary” adaptation. I love those things. You should love those things, too.

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The Sin of Nora Moran: This is THE most melodramatic title on the list. A pre-Hayes Code doozie, this tale of a young woman wronged by the men around her is much more than the sum of its story. The frequently clunky acting combined with numerous montages and utterly absurd plot details (ALERT: vintage circus nonsense) make this a wonderful artifact of its time and place. I hesitate to use the word “underrated” since the relative buzz about a work shouldn’t impact the degree to which one appreciates it, but this movie might qualify as an “underrated” gem.

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Christina: I feel like this is the real DISCOVERY from my Fandor wanderings. This 1984 sex adventure is the second Harry Alan Towers pulp adaptation on this list. I don’t even seek these out–they seem to find me! Based on an expansive series of pulp novels written under the female pseudonym Blakely St. James (a psuedonym that was shared by multiple authors, including noted science fiction author, journalist, and computer programmer Charles Platt), Christina was intended to be a star-making vehicle for Jewel Shepard. The director of this slice of 80s culture is Paco Lara, whose version of The Monk I found so baffling at one point. Recounting the adventures of the world’s richest heiress, Christina screws her way across the Iberian peninsula while attempting to evade lesbian terrorists, pirates, and other assorted ne’er do wells. The plot hardly matters; what’s of importance here is that this is the sort of movie that thinks black leather gloved hands rolling toy cars across a woman’s abdomen is a reasonable representation of lesbian sex. Pure stupidity, pure joy.

Nine Circles of Pet Cinematary: Profile and Podcast

I just can’t quit the world of weird movies! My good friend Wendy Mays has started a podcast about animals on film, so I jumped at the chance to discuss two of my favorite animal movies with her (I got to pick two movies for a single show because I am greedy and spoiled). Check out our conversation about “Unmasking the Idol” and “Order of the Black Eagle,” which feature a karate-chopping, tank-driving baboon, over at the Pet Cinematary website. Topics discussed include baboon boners, cake Hitler, and how ninjas are a lot like pimps.

Should you wish for even MORE Boon the Baboon related content, you can read my review of “Unmasking the Idol” here and my thoughts on “Order of the Black Eagle” here.

Photo by SylivieTheCamera.com
Photo by SylivieTheCamera.com

I was recently given the honor of an artist profile over at my heavy metal blog of choice, Nine Circles. I talk about how much I love the people I collaborate with, list some of my favorite music, and reveal how low I’ll sink to get to work with especially exciting new folks. You can read the article here.

Elsewhere: Horizontal Collaboration, More Jean Rollin, Miro Snejdr, More Artwork…

It’s true, friends–gone are the days when I’m blogging about every single thing I’ve watched. Your devastation resonates directly into my black, patent-leather heart, but don’t despair. My graphomania is now dispersed across the web on various *other* platforms.

Living Dead Girl by Sarah Horrocks
Living Dead Girl by Sarah Horrocks

The second part of my look into the work of Jean Rollin and his connection to the world of visual art and comics can be read over at Dirge: Pulp Surrealism, Collage, and the Influence of Jean Rollin

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December’s Great Moment in Historical Sluttery discussed Isadora Duncan, the Mother of Modern Dance, whose life was dramatic on every conceivable level, privately and publicly. Isadora Duncan: The Ritual of Dance and Freedom

Photo credit: Kate Lamb
Photo credit: Kate Lamb

At Heathen Harvest, I had an opportunity to chat with musician and composer Miro Snejdr, probably best known for his work with Death in June. Miro is one of the most organically gifted individuals I’ve spoken with, and the sort of person who thinks that it’s “boring” to be able to sit at a piano and create music as if touched by the hand of a higher power. The Magic Hand of Chance: An Interview with Miro Snejdr

horizontalcollaboration

Also at Heathen Harvest, I reviewed Horizontal Collaboration, the latest book by my favorite historian, the amazing Mel Gordon. His book on Weimar Berlin, Voluptuous Panic, has had a tremendous impact on my life, and Horizontal Collaboration is a worthy successor. Horizontal Collaboration: The Erotic World of Paris, 1920-1946

I also contributed my top three albums of the year to Heathen Harvest’s Best of 2015 list. It’s not terribly surprising if you’ve been reading this site for any period of time. Heathen Harvest’s Best of 2015/Best of the Quinquennium

DeathAndTheMaiden-Screen

In the midst of all this other running-about, I have a new print available for purchase. You can buy a copy of my Death and the Maiden shown above in the Heretical Sexts shop.

Should you be interested in working with me, I’ve also got a brand-new portfolio site you can visit to learn more about my work style and availability: www.TenebrousKate.com